LITTLE SUSY'S FIFTH BIRTHDAY
for which her father has made her a large-scale dollhouse.  From a book by Elizabeth Prentiss.
GOOD INTENTIONS               (Enlarged picture)
Quite happy playing with her primitive dolls' house, this little girl tries to be patient when brotherly renovations don't turn out too well.  Based on a poem by Juliana Horatia Ewing.
RAGGED ROBIN
"Ragged Robin" and her friends make dolls' house furniture--tester beds--at a workshop/school for the poor.
I began this project when I was jokingly challenged to make a miniature museum in a chocolate box.  The idea was that I'd make a museum (in 1/144 scale) that specialized in  miniatures--which would mean that it would be full of dollhouses in 1/1728 scale, mostly under a quarter-inch high.

I soon found that although I could make 1/1728 scale houses, very few people (including me) could see them.  So the museum will display each miniature house in a setting, in a case about 3/4 inch square.  Each setting tells part of the story of dollhouse play.

For fuller details about a setting, please click on the picture, or go to the Stories page.


Stories
Miniature Museum of the History of Dollhouse Play
Stories
I began this project when I was jokingly challenged to make a miniature museum in a chocolate box.  The idea was that I'd make a museum (in 1/144 scale) that specialized in  miniatures--which would mean that it would be full of dollhouses in 1/1728 scale, mostly under a quarter-inch high.

I soon found that although I could make 1/1728 scale houses, very few people (including me) could see them.  So the museum will display each miniature house in a setting, in a case about 3/4 inch square.  Each setting tells part of the story of dollhouse play.

For fuller details about a setting, please click on the picture, or go to the Stories page.


AN EARLY FORM
Only one wall and a floor, and in "play" scale, but I think it counts as a dollhouse.
WET PAINT
An unusually kind brother has just painted his sister's dollhouse for her.
RAGGED ROBIN
"Ragged Robin" and her friends make dolls' house furniture--tester beds--at a workshop/school for the poor.
GOOD INTENTIONS               (Enlarged picture)
Quite happy playing with her primitive dolls' house, this little girl tries to be patient when brotherly renovations don't turn out too well.  Based on a poem by Juliana Horatia Ewing.
Home
A visitor to the museum, bringing along a dollhouse that she found put out with someone's garbage; she wonders how old it is.

(My miniaturized  adaptation of a story told by internet friend Else from Holland, who did indeed find a dollhouse on the sidewalk and managed to get it home on her electric scooter.  Made with her permission, and not for sale.
Update: Else has had a dramatic improvement in health, and no longer needs her scooter.)
Toys in Miniature: Frances Armstrong
Although the chocolate box used for the museum is made of clear plastic, it wasn't designed for looking through, and eventually I will probably replace it with clearer acrylic.  It is lit inside, but the view from the  outside is fuzzy.  I have made the box so that the display cases can be slid out and viewed more closely on their own.
          There is still plenty of space in the museum, and I'm hoping to bring it up to date with miniature versions of many more dollhouses.  1/1728 scale is awfully tiny, though! 
KNOWING HER PLACE
Tops are for boys, baby-houses are for girls

LITTLE SUSY'S FIFTH BIRTHDAY
for which her father has made her a large-scale dollhouse.  From a book by Elizabeth Prentiss.
Stories about museum scenes
Not yet available
The display cases can be removed for a better look.  The picture below shows the museum with nothing in it, and with the front swung aside.  The back and front are each six inches long.
Tiny  houses to make
Stories

This page was last updated on: May 15, 2010

A new scene is pictured below.  It was inspired by a magazine report on a community that collected unwanted dollhouses, renovated them, and auctioned them  off in aid of a charity that helps to house the homeless.  I've adapted the story (with permission), imagining the group getting together in the museum to work on the houses.
.The details are hard to see.  On the left a young child is helping out, and at the front there is a rather elaborate treehouse, just like the one in the original story.  Ther middle picture includes two volunteers in blue sweaters, one in a check apron, and three others you can hardly see at all.  On the right is the treehouse again, and another volunteer admiring it.