Some of the wide variety of homes that Lostlings live in can be seen on the
Dollhouses
pages, with prices.
Some small people on the Dolls page may be Lostlings who are interested in being adopted (the charge is $10).
      Lostlings
I have given this name to the small people, half an inch high, who so frequently jump off my work desk and are never seen again.  At least, they're never found again, because then they would be foundlings.  I imagine that they have settled down somewhere, and live as they please. 
Some perhaps live like mice or insects in nooks and burrows, but I think that some of them have set up quite elaborate homes, in a variety of styles, using whatever materials they can find on the floor beneath my desk.  Over the years they could have put together quite well-furnished houses. 
They are survivors with adventurous spirits, and might be quite happy to go somewhere new with the right purchaser.
Part of Lostlingland, apparently just discovered by the little girl at top right.  (She is about four inches high.)
A children's party, organized by one of the more affluent Lostling families.  The pictures are not very clear (but Lostlings  do hate being photographed so I couldn't get any closer).  And remember, these children are well under half an inch high.
If you look carefully in the pictures above you can see a Punch and Judy theatre, with a young boy beating a drum to announce that the show is beginning.  Some children have dressed up--you can see a butterfly or two, and a queen in a purple robe.   A group of smaller children are sitting down to give their dolls a  party, and behind a big table stand the butler and a maid, watching to make sure that the children wait politely until everyone is ready.
Some small people on the Dolls page may be Lostlings who are interested in being adopted (the charge is $10).
Some of the wide variety of homes that Lostlings live in can be seen on the
Dollhouses
pages, with prices.
Toys in Miniature: Frances Armstrong
You can just make out a tiny girl in pink by the tree trunk.  She is watching the encounter between her friend in blue (on the right) and the "giant" child.  A boy is scaling the left side of the tree trunk.  THe same trunk appears to be a house--there's a door in that crack--and to the left is a grey-haired middle-aged lady, standing by a wheelchair.  The wheelchair actually belongs to her mother, the white-haired lady in green, on the left, who is tending her garden, and chatting to her grandson, near the tree trunk in beige and brown.
Here are some clearer pictures of some of the Lostlings in the outdoor photo.
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This page was last updated on: May 15, 2010


October 20, 2001: When last seen, Lostlingland had some interesting new  residents, or perhaps visitors.  A bearded artist was sculpting a gargoyle-like figure much bigger than him on one of the cliffs; a woodcarver was at work; there were tiny lights in a cave; there seemed to be a play rehearsal going on, with characters in Tudor clothes; and there was a clown handing out balloons to the children. 

Update, May 20, 2002: After the spring miniature show season Lostlingland is fairly quiet.  Perhaps some of its inhabitants  have moved to  your miniature setting? . . .

And another  update, after a  long break, May 20, 2004:  It seems that some of the Lostlings have become curious about my silence, and have come back to the workbench to find me.   As it turned out, I found them, and managed to get a photo of them.  In these pictures  you can see two who have moved into one of my wood piles.  One is exploring, the other has found a  quiet corner to read her  book.
These two were quite happy to have their pictures used, in exchange for all the wood and books they wanted. but  I can foresee charges of exploitation if I overdo it.
Lostlings